Liberated Gatekeeping for White Women
Dec
13
9:00 AM09:00

Liberated Gatekeeping for White Women

Liberated Gatekeeping for White Women

Dec 13th Thursday 9-3:30pm

You have experience, expertise and great skills, and you’ve worked hard to get to where you’re at. You have an analysis of power and privilege, and are trying to figure out how to do your work within this awareness. Holding the nuances of sexism, internalized sexism, accountability, allyship and intersectionality can be challenging and confusing.

In the United States, white women comprise over 80% of employees in nonprofits of all kinds, as well as in education and nursing. As the dominant group in these and other service-oriented professions, we have a responsibility to be accountable for our racial privilege and its impacts. In this workshop, we will work from the crossroads of white privilege/supremacy, internalized sexism and patriarchy. There is a tension here that we must notice, feel and understand. As white people who are targeted by sexism, we get to look at the potential we have yet to step into where gender and race overlap. We must also be responsible and accountable for both our racial privilege and for undoing our internalized sexism.

In this workshop, we will strengthen our service to racial equity and community liberation. Each session will focus on a specific topic with readings, break out groups and whole group time. Questions we will cover include: 

  • How do you balance the expectations of your organization or institution, including its cultural norms and pressure from decision-makers like the board or electeds, and be accountable for your gatekeeping status?

  • What do accountability and allyship look like with people of color who you manage or supervise?

  • How can we interrupt the ways that our internalized sexism colludes with our conditioning toward “white solidarity,” our tacit enabling of white control and comfort at the expense of people of color?

  • How can we unpack notions of success in a white male world in order to inhabit our wholeness as white women in relationship with women of color and as models for other white women?

Accountability:

**Informed and inspired by the work of The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond and Monica Dennis and Rachael Ibrahim, Move to End Violence Initiative. With deep gratitude and acknowledgement.

Our colleagues of color have asked us to host this training, their perspective informs the content and we are in regular communication with them to apply feedback.

The main ways I am trying to be accountable as a white person is doing racial justice work in relationship with people of color that I am collaborating or facilitating with specifically women of color: Keonna Jackson, Natasha Marin, Regent Brown, Jabali Stewart, Aparna Rae, and Katie Mooney.  There has been a specific ask for white women to get coaching around their management and this series is a response to that need.

Organizations that I work with or support that are led by POC are Wayfind Legal, Nonprofit Assistance Center, Resource Generation, Social Justice Fund, Justlead and Rainer Valley Corps.

White groups/colleagues that I go to or lead are European Dissent, Nonprofit Anti-Racist Coalition and anti-racist white women for equity. I make mistakes often, I make amends imperfectly, and I am committed to living in integrity and in connection. 

Donations will be made to Real Rent Duwamish and People's Institute.

Refund policy:

No refund are given after registration. If there is another series, people can transfer to that one if they can no longer attend this one.

Facilitators:

Fleur Larsen started facilitating 20 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Her style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, joy, and purposeful results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach goals. Currently, she works with several corporate and nonprofit groups facilitating retreats, trainings and workshops in addition to one on one coaching. 

Fleurs work as a Seattle-based facilitator is focused on equity, social justice, diversity and inclusion, team building, emotional intelligence, experiential education and community development.

Michelle Gislason

My purpose and passion: Walking with individuals and organizations as they become who they say they most want to be. 

My stance on leadership: Unlike the traditional, solo, heroic leader model, leadership is a process, not a title. Therefore, it can live anywhere in an organization, a community, or in a movement. Leadership at its best is about working with others to fully realize an organizational or community agenda and to mobilize to tackle adaptive challenges. 

My primary approaches:
• Coaching and appreciative inquiry
• Relationship building and finding common ground
• Storytelling and honoring multiple narratives
• Leveraging strengths
• Frameworks and common language
• Strategic design thinking and using liberating structures
• Margin to center and power analysis

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Jan
10
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

A COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP FOR INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS

Jan 10th, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

+ Exploring institutional narratives and the structures.

+ Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.

+ Role-play for navigating difficult conversations.

Natasha Marin is an artist and independent consultant primarily focused on digital engagement and community building. Natasha uses social media to find, connect, and build alliances among individuals, communities, and organizations. Her work supports building sustainable communities through creative engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter. NONWHITEWORKS supports client-collaborators with finding your audience, sharpening messaging, and connecting with influencers who can further amplify dialogues. Marin has published, lectured, and presented around the world for a diverse audience of "doers." Her social experiment, Reparations, gained local, national, and international attention for making concepts like "leveraging privilege" more accessible to the mainstream.

Charles Mudede—who writes about film, books, music, and his life in Rhodesia, Zimbabwe, the USA, and the UK for The Stranger—was born near a steel plant in Kwe Kwe, Zimbabwe. He has no memory of this birth, but he does remember noticing himself in the mirror for this first time—it happened on May 3, 1972. Mudede is also a filmmaker: Two of his films, Police Beat and Zoo, premiered at Sundance, and Zoo was screened at Cannes. Mudede has written for the New York Times, Cinema Scope, Ars Electronica, C Theory, and academic journals. He also wrote the liner notes for Best of Del Tha Funkee Homosapien: Elektra Years. Mudede has lived in Seattle since 1989.

Fleur Larsen is a social justice and equity advocate, she strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of my life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). Fleurs focus is on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports my clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work.

Bert Hopkins is a racial justice educator, trainer, consultant, and the Equity & Inclusion Manager at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands. He has worked with numerous community-based nonprofits and foundations, in higher education, and for nine years as a middle school teacher and curriculum coordinator. Whether with young people or adults, the heart of this work has been opening space for the groups he works with to engage authentically and deeply in order to move from individual awareness to collective action. Bert works daily to actively leverage his privilege as a cis-male white-identified person.

 

 

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Jan Power with not Power Over: Accountability in Action for White Women
Jan
28
9:00 AM09:00

Jan Power with not Power Over: Accountability in Action for White Women

Date: Jan 28th 9-3:30pm

Location: The 2100 Building 2100 24th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144 register here

(Image credit Janna Yashchuk).

In the United States, white women comprise over 80% of employees in nonprofits of all kinds, as well as in education and nursing. As the dominant group in these and other service-oriented professions, we have a responsibility to be accountable for our racial privilege and its impacts. In this workshop, we will work from the crossroads of white privilege/supremacy, internalized sexism and patriarchy. There is a tension here that we must notice, feel and understand. As white people who are targeted by sexism, we get to look at the potential we have yet to step into where gender and race overlap. We must also be responsible and accountable for both our racial privilege and for undoing our internalized sexism.

Key Topics covered:

  • Strengthen our understanding of racial equity and community liberation

  • Power with not power over requires us to know our power, to be powerful and to use our gatekeeping status for liberation

  • Based on feedback and requests from women of color colleagues and friends, this training will explore how to ground into our personal power and share power more gracefully in anti-racism and liberation strategies.

Accountability:

Our colleagues of color have asked us to host this training, their perspective informs the content and we are in regular communication with them to apply feedback.

The main ways I am trying to be accountable as a white person is doing racial justice work in relationship with people of color that I am collaborating or facilitating with specifically women of color: Keonna Jackson, Natasha Marin, Regent Brown, Jabali Stewart, Aparna Rae, and Maketa Wilborn.  There has been a specific ask for white women to get coaching around their management and this series is a response to that need.

Organizations that I work with or support that are led by POC are Wayfind Legal, Nonprofit Assistance Center, Resource Generation, Social Justice Fund, Justlead and Rainer Valley Corps.

White groups/colleagues that I go to or lead are European Dissent, Nonprofit Anti-Racist Coalition and anti-racist white women for equity. I make mistakes often, I make amends imperfectly, and I am committed to living in integrity and in connection. 

And donate a percentage to Real Rent Duwamish.

Refund policy:

No refund are given after registration. If there is another series, people can transfer to that one if they can no longer attend this one.

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Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity
Jan
30
8:30 AM08:30

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Wednesday Jan 30th,  8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

2100 Building 2100 24th Avenue South Seattle

Registration

Join us for this practical, hands on supervisory and leadership skills workshop grounded in anti-bias principles to enhance your coaching skills, and heighten your ability to supervise with an equity lens.

Participants will have the opportunity to identify their own biases and make connections to how those might be influencing their leadership style or supervising skills.

Learning objectives include:

  • Clearly stated values to drive leadership

  • Understanding of personal bias and blindspots

  • Skills and strategies for equitable management

  • Identify the link between valuing equity and HR to implement into policies and procedures

___________________________________________________________________________

As Supervisors and Leaders committed to equity in the workplace, how can we implement and execute what we’ve learned and create the change we want to see and create more effective, accountable, and equitable organizations as we do it?

This training is intended to introduce to some and reinforce to others the fundamentals of implicit bias, power and privilege, and giving and receiving feedback. As we work to develop and create multicultural workplaces, this workshop will challenge us to examine our beliefs, attitudes, and practices about the people with whom we have been tasked to lead. It will provide participants with a solid understanding of leading with your values and how to administer the human resources and operational practices of your organization thru the lens of equity. Upon completion, you will be able to answer the question? “What do I do now?” as well as some practical tools to advance your work.

Participants will leave the workshop with:

  1. A clear link between valuing equity and implementing it into leadership

  2. An understanding of personal bias and blindspots

  3. Skills and strategies for management grounded in power and privilege analysis

  4. Opportunities to infuse equity within the 6 areas of the employee lifecycle i.e. job descriptions, recruiting & retention and more!

  5. Ideas that can be implemented into your organization resulting in an immediate impact

Who will benefit from this workshop?

This experiential workshop is ideal for leaders interested in applying their basic knowledge of social justice, race, and biases to become more effective leaders in organizations of all sizes and at all stages of their development. All that’s needed is a desire to either develop or refine self-awareness practices on your team or within your organization. Participants should be in a position to enact change within their organization. This means supervisors, managers, directors, operations professionals, human resources professionals, executive directors, leaders of teams, or people with the capacity and energy to start making changes.

We strongly recommend that organizations send 2-3 people to the training to partner in sharing the learning and implementation when you return to your organization. Get a discount if you register 3 or more staff from the same organization. (See group rate ticket option on registration page.)

This workshop is brought to you in partnership with: HR & Equity Consulting Firm and Leadership for Change

Limited number of partial scholarship are available upon request. For more info, contact Mike Beebe at mike@leadershipforchangeconsulting.com

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Sep
27
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

A COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP FOR INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS

September 27th, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

+ Exploring institutional narratives and the structures.

+ Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.

+ Role-play for navigating difficult conversations.

Natasha Marin is an artist and independent consultant primarily focused on digital engagement and community building. Natasha uses social media to find, connect, and build alliances among individuals, communities, and organizations. Her work supports building sustainable communities through creative engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter. NONWHITEWORKS supports client-collaborators with finding your audience, sharpening messaging, and connecting with influencers who can further amplify dialogues. Marin has published, lectured, and presented around the world for a diverse audience of "doers." Her social experiment, Reparations, gained local, national, and international attention for making concepts like "leveraging privilege" more accessible to the mainstream.

Elvin Nathan Jones is called to oneness by dance and spirit. Through movement, muscle-memory, deep listening, and kinesthethic learning, Jones both embodies and escapes the fluctuating windchill of the Seattle's often rude and hella-racist "freeze." His qualifications include a history of love, gentleness, and understanding. He has also been a gay, black-identified biracial man his entire life. In his role as co-facilitator, he holds space and makes room for both the body and the spirit-- which allows for the possibility of deep transformation.

Priya Frank is the Associate Director for Community Programs at Seattle Art Museum where her focus is on partnerships, programming, and equity related initiatives. Previous work as art curator at LUCID Lounge and in advancement at the University of Washington have influenced her passion and heart for authentic community building. Priya is a member of the Seattle Arts Commission, a board member of On the Boards, and a graduate of Leadership Tomorrow’s class of 2015. She holds a B.A. in Communications and American Ethnic Studies from University of Washington Seattle and an M.A. in Cultural Studies from University of Washington Bothell.

Whether it’s through investment in institutional, corporate, academic or community arenas, Priya seeks to create space and experiences in Seattle that reflect the voices and perspectives of people of color in an authentic way. She hopes that through reciprocal, community-centered collaborations and innovative, joyful creativity, she can honor those who paved the way for her and further support pathways so that people who look like her can see themselves represented, respected, heard and heralded in all of those areas.

David Rue is a dance artist born in Liberia, and raised in Minnesota. He is a graduate of the University of Minnesota with a bachelor of individualized studies that combined Journalism, English, and Dance. He has also worked as a freelance arts and entertainment writer for the Minneapolis based publication, The Line Media. He currently works collaboratively with Seattle-based choreographers, visual artists, and research scientists to explore the stories held within the body. David holds an MFA in Arts Leadership from Seattle University and works as the Public Programs Coordinator at Seattle Art Museum.

"When I first moved to the United States it was the early 90s, the Fugees had just come out and I was in New York, so I grew up thinking being a refugee was the coolest thing in the world. They made it so dope. I had such a sense of pride in being a West African person, a Liberian person. And I think that strength lies in wearing that as a shield of armor, never wavering, with that kind of strength because it empowers me, it's made me who I am, it's made me who I'm going to be." - on Black Bois

Fleur Larsen is a social justice and equity advocate, she strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of my life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). Fleurs focus is on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports my clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work.

Bert Hopkins is a racial justice educator, trainer, consultant, and the Equity & Inclusion Manager at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands. He has worked with numerous community-based nonprofits and foundations, in higher education, and for nine years as a middle school teacher and curriculum coordinator. Whether with young people or adults, the heart of this work has been opening space for the groups he works with to engage authentically and deeply in order to move from individual awareness to collective action. Bert works daily to actively leverage his privilege as a cis-male white-identified person.

 

 

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Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity
Sep
13
9:00 AM09:00

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Thursday, September 13th,  9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

2100 Building 2100 24th Avenue South Seattle

Registration $175 early bird, $200 Regular, $150 group discount

Join us for this practical, hands-on supervisory and leadership skills workshop grounded in anti-bias principles to enhance your coaching skills, and heighten your ability to supervise with an equity lens. Fleur, Keonna, and Mike bring a unique combination of experiences working with non-profit, public sector, and corporate organizations. They all bring a shared commitment to creating a more just world and have thought deeply about equity in the workplace.

Participants will have the opportunity to identify their own biases and make connections to how those might be influencing their leadership style or supervising skills.

Learning objectives include:

  • Clearly stated values to drive leadership

  • Understanding of personal bias and blindspots

  • Skills and strategies for equitable management

  • Identify the link between valuing equity and HR to implement into policies and procedures

As Supervisors and Leaders committed to equity in the workplace, how can we implement and execute what we’ve learned and create the change we want to see and create more effective, accountable, and equitable organizations as we do it?

This training is intended to challenge us to examine our beliefs, attitudes, and practices about the people with whom we have been tasked to lead. It will provide participants with a solid understanding of leading with your values, giving and receiving feedback and how to administer the human resources and operational practices of your organization thru the lens of equity. Upon completion, you will be able to answer the question? “What do I do now?” as well as some practical tools to advance your work.

Participants will leave the workshop with:

  1. A clear link between valuing equity and implementing it into leadership

  2. An understanding of personal bias and blindspots

  3. Skills and strategies for management grounded in power and privilege analysis

  4. Opportunities to infuse equity within your HR practices

  5. Ideas that can be implemented into your organization resulting in an immediate impact

Who will benefit from this workshop?

This experiential workshop is ideal for leaders interested in applying their basic knowledge of social justice, race, and biases to become more effective leaders in organizations of all sizes and at all stages of their development. All that’s needed is a desire to either develop or refine self-awareness practices on your team or within your organization. Participants should be in a position to enact change within their organization. This means supervisors, managers, directors, operations professionals, human resources professionals, executive directors, leaders of teams, or people with the capacity and energy to start making changes.

We strongly recommend that organizations send 2-3 people to the training to partner in sharing the learning and implementation when you return to your organization. Get a discount if you register 3 or more staff from the same organization. (See group rate ticket option on registration page.)

This workshop is brought to you in partnership with: HR & Equity Consulting Firm and Leadership for Change

Limited number of partial scholarship are available upon request. For more info, contact Mike Beebe at mike@leadershipforchangeconsulting.com

Organizers: Keonna Jackson, Fleur Larsen, & Mike Beebe

This training is a collaborative effort of HR & Equity Consulting Firm's Keonna Jackson, & Fleur Larsen & Leadership for Change's Mike Beebe. Read our bios below:

Keonna Jackson

Keonna Jackson is committed to transforming lives by helping her clients uncover what blocks them from making their dreams a reality. She believes we are unlimited in our ability to accomplish our goals and she looks for opportunities to walk along side of you to see, point out and guide you towards those possibilities until you see them for yourself. She primary uses fitness to empower, inspire and motivate her clients to M.O.V.E into the body & life THEY desire! She is a multi-passionate Human Resources consultant for small to medium sized companies, with the unique skill of advocating for both the employer and employee. With over 15 years of human resources expertise, she is your strategic and tactical HR solutions business partner. She works with leadership to streamline HR administration, as well as provide solutions to ensure the mission, vision, and goals of the organization are met by applying fair and equitable practices.

Fleur Larsen

Fleur strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of her life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). She focuses on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports her clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work. Fleur started facilitating 18 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Currently, she works with several companies utilizing experiential facilitation with corporate and nonprofit groups. Fleur's style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, fun, purpose and results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach results.

Mike Beebe

Mike decided to take his passion for leadership development training and start Leadership for Change in 2004. Since then, he has worked with thousands of individuals and groups to help develop their leadership skills.  Mike has over 20 years of experience managing youth & adult leadership programs and is passionate about partnering with young people to create positive social change. His experience includes directing Penny Harvest Seattle, a youth philanthropy & service learning program, JustServe AmeriCorps, a youth anti-violence program, TEEN LINK, a hotline for youth answered by youth, and serving on the Board of Directors for COLAGE (Children of Lesbians and Gays Everywhere), a national organization advocating for the rights of GLBT families. More info on Leadership for Change can be found HERE. In 2013, Mike and a team of training colleagues launched F.A.C.E. (Facilitating Awareness & Change for Equity) Consulting Collaborative in an effort to provide stronger support to individuals, groups, and organizations striving to create a more equitable world. More info on F.A.C.E. can be found on their website.

 

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Building Resilience in Mixed Race Workplaces
Jul
20
8:30 AM08:30

Building Resilience in Mixed Race Workplaces

Building Resilience in Mixed Race Workplaces

July 20th 8:30-4:30pm POC $75 White Folks $150

Location TBD in Seattle area

We are a global population; with highly skilled professionals from vast cultural and ethnic backgrounds. This has continued to grow for decades, creating a need for organizations to transform work environments to be just and equitable. Often the burden of cultural shift falls on those who are recruited in an effort to “diversify”. This trend has its pitfalls and often leads to organizations unable to retain what few people of color, LGBTQIA+ persons, and disabled persons they may recruit.In order to elevate or avoid this burden, whiteness needs to be named and identified, white people get to unlearn oppressive norms and learn new skills for allyship and being accomplices.

For those oppressed, we will support building strategies for healing, resilience, and liberation from internalized oppression. Through dialogue and activities, this workshop will support participants progress at all levels of their journey.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understanding and awareness of the oppressive patterns in many workplaces;

  • Gain tools to create a work culture that supports all peoples working to their fullest potential;

  • Strategies on how to supervise equitably building a leadership ladder that will support the long-term growth of a multiracial multicultural staff;

  • Practice tools to actively be a part of building an inclusive and equitable culture.

This training will be a place of connection and healing centering POC voices and experiences while being a mixed race space. Drawing from circle process, experiential learning, popular education, and art of hosting techniques to guide our collective learning and liberation.

This training is for people already engaged in creating liberated workplaces and want to go deeper with more impactful strategies for eliminating white supremacy.

The Facilitators:

Regent Brown regent@fropros.com www.fropros.com

Regent is a multiracial, multicultural, dynamic, unapologetic womxn who seeks to be a partner in the personal and organizational transformation needed for culture change; a partner on the journey toward equitable thriving communities. Regent works with those who wish to impact change by looking internally- acknowledging our role in change and then move through difficult learning to remove barriers to reaching our furthest potential. Regent's belief is that true transformation comes through the collective impact of transforming one's self. Through authentic dialogue, peacemaking circles, conflict resolution, and skill development, we partner to build a culture of belonging, accountability and collective leadership that can foster such opportunities of change. Regent’s personal and leadership coaching offer tools and strategies to deepen racial equity and anti-oppression strategies to promote multicultural, inclusive and sustainable practices in all aspects of our lives. Regent also works in service to community through restorative circles and conflict resolution facilitation.

Fleur Larsen started facilitating 20 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Her style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, joy, and purposeful results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach goals. Currently, she works with several corporate and nonprofit groups facilitating retreats, trainings, and workshops in addition to one on one coaching.

Fleurs work as a facilitator is focused on equity, social justice, diversity and inclusion, team building, emotional intelligence, experiential education and community development.

 http://www.fleurlarsenfacilitation.com fleurlarsen@fleurlarsenfacilitation.com.

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Decolonizing Wealth: equity in philanthropy with Edgar Villanueva
Jul
18
10:30 AM10:30

Decolonizing Wealth: equity in philanthropy with Edgar Villanueva

Decolonizing Wealth:

Equity in philanthropy with Edgar Villanueva

July 18th Wednesday 10:30-12pm

Join Edgar Villanueva for a morning roundtable on his recent article 'Can Money be Medicine' and decolonizing philanthropy. Regional funders and grantmakers can share what they are doing to live equity and the challenges coming up.  Hear about his upcoming book 'Decolonizing Wealth' out in October.

Register here.

A suggested donation of $45 per participant will go to the Decolonizing Wealth Project, support Native Youth organizing.

About Edgar Villanueva

Edgar Villanueva is a nationally-recognized expert on social justice philanthropy. Edgar currently serves as Chair of the Board of Directors of Native Americans in Philanthropy and is a Board Member of the Andrus Family Fund, a national foundation that works to improve outcomes for vulnerable youth.

Edgar is an instructor with The Grantmaking School at the Johnson Center at Grand Valley State University and currently serves as Vice President of Programs and Advocacy at the Schott Foundation for Public Education where he oversees grant investment and capacity building supports for education justice campaigns across the United States.

Edgar previously held leadership roles at Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust in North Carolina and at the Marguerite Casey Foundation in Seattle.

Edgar is the author of Decolonizing Wealth, which offers hopeful and compelling alternatives to the dynamics of colonization in the philanthropic and social finance sectors.

In addition to working in philanthropy for many years, he has consulted with numerous nonprofit organizations and national and global philanthropies on advancing racial equity inside of their institutions and through their investment strategies.

Edgar holds two degrees from the Gillings Global School of Public Health at The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. Edgar is an enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina and resides in Brooklyn, NY.

 

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Jun
21
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

A COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP FOR INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS

April 12, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

+ Exploring institutional narratives and the structures.

+ Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.

+ Role-play for navigating difficult conversations.

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LOCAL EVENTS | SEATTLE
Jun
5
to Oct 4

LOCAL EVENTS | SEATTLE

LOCAL EVENTS | SEATTLE

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Diversity & Inclusion Strategies for Philanthropy
May
31
11:00 AM11:00

Diversity & Inclusion Strategies for Philanthropy

EDI strategies for Philanthropy

Diversity breeds innovation. With over $500B dollars at play for social change, and growing, philanthropy needs to adapt to a changing landscape of donors and nonprofits. The future of philanthropy lies with women, millennials, and people of color - who are investing billions in social change. A EDI (equity, diversity and inclusion) lens is a powerful way to reframe your organization's work to drive sustainable change.

This training is ideal for social sector individuals and organizations looking to embrace DEI across all levels of their organization. If you are looking to create an equity committee, an EDI statement or secure committed budget amount to live your values, then join us. You will walk away from this workshop with practical tools to engage your colleagues and implement policies, resources, and tools to live equity.

Learning outcomes:

  • Build a shared vocabulary for EDI, grounded in philanthropy and the social sector  

  • Understand how a EDI lens can be used to assess program or investment strategy, evaluation, outreach, hiring and fund development

  • 100 day plan to build greater EDI awareness within your organization

Through this workshop conversation, we will ask powerful questions and work with you to generate strategies for integrating EDI (equity, diversity, and inclusion) to drive impact within your organization. This is an opportunity to connect, collaborate and be in community with social sector professions, looking to build self and organizational awareness to guide action.

Guiding Questions

We will focus at the intersection of EDI, Program Strategy and Fundraising - and share best practice solutions that will help you take the steps forward to building an organization that is inclusive.   

  • What would it look like to meet your organization's’ mission?

  • Are you in alignment with your organizational values internally with your own staff and externally with your clients or program delivery?

  • How do you engender trust when giving or getting money?

Agenda

11 - 11:15am Welcome

11:15 - 11:30am The history of philanthropy and  current philanthropic landscape

11:30 - 12pm Explore a EDI framework at the intersection of program strategy, fundraising and

12 - 12:30pm Strategies for implementation: tomorrow and beyond

Close and network

Note: *Wherever you are in your own relationship to EDI work, you can join in the conversation and start where you are.

** Recommend reading:

Race to Lead report  by Building Movements Project

Decolonizing Wealth by Edgar Villanova

Power Moves by National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy

Hopeful Trends in Philanthropy by Vu Le Nonprofit AF

Race and Equity by Lupe Poblano at Compass Point

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Lenses of culture, Levels of change: Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators
May
5
10:00 AM10:00

Lenses of culture, Levels of change: Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators

Lenses of culture, Levels of change:

Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators

Join us May 5th 10-4pm Register here.

The next generation of students is living in real time through a national dialogue on change, diversity, and equity. Businesses, higher education institutions, and community groups are all wrestling with what it means to be inclusive, diverse, authentic and equitable. Groups that are succeeding are realizing they must empower each individual educators to be a leader and that teams of leaders working together go further.

This workshop is for white educators who want to examine their own whiteness and the white culture of their schools to better serve all students. People of color are welcome and encouraged to attend for free. As white educators ourselves, we do this work in accountability to our own colleagues of color and anti-racist organizations and communities.

Learning objectives for this training:

  • Examine mindsets and assumptions about what it takes to be an inclusive white teacher

  • Explore the connection between organizational culture, unconscious bias and how they affect your behavior and student engagement

  • Practice with authentic dialogue and conflict resolution to have courageous conversations surrounding race, gender, orientation, ethnicity, etc.

 

 

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Lenses of culture, Levels of change: Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators
Mar
10
10:00 AM10:00

Lenses of culture, Levels of change: Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators

Lenses of culture, Levels of change:

Co-creating Educational Equity with White Educators

Join us March 10th 10-4pm Register here.

We are living on the edge of major cultural shifts in our country and indeed the world. We are recognizing more than ever our interdependence with one another, the importance of valuing which of our differences make a difference and learning how to find common ground with each other intellectually and emotionally.

The next generation of students is living in real time through a national dialogue on change, diversity, and equity. Businesses, higher education institutions, and community groups are all wrestling with what it means to be inclusive, diverse, authentic and equitable. Groups that are succeeding are realizing they must empower each individual educators to be a leader and that teams of leaders working together go further.

This workshop is for white educators who want to examine their own whiteness and the white culture of their schools to better serve all students. People of color are welcome and encouraged to attend for free. As white educators ourselves, we do this work in accountability to our own colleagues of color and anti-racist organizations and communities.

Learning objectives for this training:

  • Examine mindsets and assumptions about what it takes to be an inclusive white teacher

  • Explore the connection between organizational culture, unconscious bias and how they affect your behavior and student engagement

  • Practice with authentic dialogue and conflict resolution to have courageous conversations surrounding race, gender, orientation, ethnicity, etc.

This training is experiential and will focus on each individual participant to critically self-reflect and assess the educational institution they teach in. It is needed for all of us to think about how we learn, think and feel when putting our minds on issues of equity and diversity. If it was about reading the right article, listening to the best speaker or implementing the latest 3 tips then we would all have done it by now. So come prepared to look inward to better equip you when teaching outward.

Accountability:

Noah and Fleur are committed to being accountable as white folks doing anti-racist work. We are in relationship with colleagues and friends of color, organizations led by people of color and communities leading liberation and anti-racism work. We are open and honest about our own blindspots and racism as we lead authentically with other white people.

This training was born out of a request by my colleague of color who is currently at a private school I've been working with for 2 years now leading gender and race-based caucusing (I'm with the white women and he leads the men of color). We were chatting about the lack of trainings on racial justice and whiteness put on by the NW Association of Independent schools (where I presented on white women in education last fall). 

So we decided to create our own. The focus is on whiteness and systemic privilege, how it shows up in our bias, with our students, our teaching, our curriculum, our schools, and communities. And in action; strategies for anti-racist education.

POC are invited to attend the workshop for free as an act of reparations (a close colleague is Tashi Ko who started reparationsme.com). The POC registered so far are people I know and am in relationship with. They will get to decide how they want to be in the space if they share or want to break out and meet separately.

Noah and I both lead a lot of white caucus work while being accountable to our colleagues of color.
Right now the main ways I am accountable as a white person doing racial justice work is in relationships with people of color that I am collaborating or facilitating with: Keonna Jackson, Natasha Marin, Patty Julio, Regent Brown, Jabali Stewart, Aparna Rae, Regent Brown, and Katie Mooney. 

Organizations that Fleur works with or support that are led by POC are Wayfind Legal, Nonprofit Assistance Center, Resource Generation, Social Justice Fund, Justlead and Rainer Valley Corps. White groups that Fleur goes to or leads locally are with European Dissent, Nonprofit Anti-Racist Coalition and anti-racist white women for equity.Noah works with White Men as Full Diversity Partners nationally.

We will be donating 5% of the proceeds to Real Rent Duwamish.

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White Women in Management: Racial Equity in Practice
Feb
7
5:30 AM05:30

White Women in Management: Racial Equity in Practice

White Women in Management: Racial Equity in Practice

A 3 part series on April 2nd, May 7th, and June 4th 4:30-7pm Location tbd

Registration here $240 for the series.

This workshop is for white women in mid-career or later who have positional authority and supervisory responsibilities within their organizations. 

You have experience, expertise, and great skills, and you’ve worked hard to get to where you’re at. You have an analysis of power and privilege and are trying to figure out how to do your work within this awareness. Holding the nuances of sexism, internalized sexism, accountability, allyship and intersectionality can be challenging and confusing.

In the United States, white women comprise over 80% of employees in nonprofits of all kinds, as well as in education and nursing. As the dominant group in these and other service-oriented professions, we have a responsibility to be accountable for our racial privilege and its impacts. In this workshop, we will work from the crossroads of white privilege/supremacy, internalized sexism, and patriarchy. There is a tension here that we must notice, feel and understand. As white people who are targeted by sexism, we get to look at the potential we have yet to step into where gender and race overlap. We must also be responsible and accountable for both our racial privilege and for undoing our internalized sexism.

In this workshop, we will strengthen our service to racial equity and community liberation. Each session will focus on a specific topic with readings, break out groups and whole group time.

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Feb
1
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

A COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP FOR INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS

February 1, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

+ Exploring institutional narratives and the structures.

+ Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.

+ Role-play for navigating difficult conversations.

Natasha Marin is an artist and independent consultant primarily focused on digital engagement and community building. Natasha uses social media to find, connect, and build alliances among individuals, communities, and organizations. Her work supports building sustainable communities through creative engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter. NONWHITEWORKS supports client-collaborators with finding your audience, sharpening messaging, and connecting with influencers who can further amplify dialogues. Marin has published, lectured, and presented around the world for a diverse audience of "doers." Her social experiment, Reparations, gained local, national, and international attention for making concepts like "leveraging privilege" more accessible to the mainstream.

Elvin Nathan Jones is called to oneness by dance and spirit. Through movement, muscle-memory, deep listening, and kinesthethic learning, Jones both embodies and escapes the fluctuating windchill of the Seattle's often rude and hella-racist "freeze." His qualifications include a history of love, gentleness, and understanding. He has also been a gay, black-identified biracial man his entire life. In his role as co-facilitator, he holds space and makes room for both the body and the spirit-- which allows for the possibility of deep transformation.

Nikkita Oliver is a Seattle-based creative, teaching artist, attorney, and organizer. Her writing has appeared in the South Seattle Emerald, Crosscut, and the Stranger. Olivers holds a J.D. and Masters of Education from the University of Washington. She is also the case manager for Creative Justice, an arts-based alternative to incarceration, and has worked for arts organizations such as Writers in the Schools and Arts Corp. Nikkita was named by Seattle Magazine as one of Seattle's Most Influential of 2017 and is the recipient of the 2017 King County NAACP President's Award, 2017 Community Legal Services Imagine Justice Visionary of the Year, the University of Washington Women’s Law Caucus Outstanding Achievement as a Young Lawyer Award (2017), the Seattle Office of Civil Rights Artist Human Rights Leader Award (2015), and the 2014 Seattle Poetry Slam Grand Champion. She has opened for Cornel West and Chuck D of Public Enemy and performed on The Late Night Show with Stephen Colbert.

Fleur Larsen is a social justice and equity advocate, she strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of my life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). Fleurs focus is on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports my clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work.

Bert Hopkins is a racial justice educator, trainer, consultant, and the Equity & Inclusion Manager at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands. He has worked with numerous community-based nonprofits and foundations, in higher education, and for nine years as a middle school teacher and curriculum coordinator. Whether with young people or adults, the heart of this work has been opening space for the groups he works with to engage authentically and deeply in order to move from individual awareness to collective action. Bert works daily to actively leverage his privilege as a cis-male white-identified person.

 

 

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Jan
11
9:00 AM09:00

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Leadership Skills for Workplace Diversity

Mon, October 30,  9:00 AM – 4:00 PM The 2100 Building 2100 24th Avenue South Seattle

Join us for this practical, hands-on supervisory skills workshop which will improve your efficiency, enhance your coaching skills, and heighten your ability to supervise with an equity lens. Fleur, Keonna, and Mike bring a unique combination of experience working with non-profit, public sector, and corporate organizations. They all bring a shared commitment to creating a more just world and have thought deeply about equity in the workplace.

Participants will have the opportunity to identify their own biases and make connections to how those might be influencing their leadership style or supervising skills.

Learning objectives include:

Clearly stated values to drive leadership

Understanding of personal bias and blindspots

Skills and strategies for equitable management

Identify the link between valuing equity and implementing it into leadership

__________________________________________________________________________

Workshop Description: As Supervisors and Leaders committed to equity in the workplace, how can we implement and execute what we’ve learned and create the change we want to see and create more effective, accountable, and equitable organizations as we do it?

This training is intended to challenge us to examine our beliefs, attitudes, and practices of the people with whom we have been tasked to lead. It will provide participants with a solid understanding of leading with your values, giving and receiving feedback and how to administer the human resources and operational practices of your organization thru the lens of equity. Upon completion, you will be able to answer the question? “What do I do now?” as well as some practical tools to advance your work.

Participants will leave the workshop with:

  1. Identify the link between valuing equity and implementing it into leadership.

  2. Understanding of personal bias and blindspots

  3. Skills and strategies for equitable management

  4. A general understanding of how to infuse equity within your HR practices

  5. Be exposed to tips and ideas that can be implemented into your organization resulting in an immediate impact.

Who will benefit from this workshop?

This experiential workshop is ideal for leaders interested in applying their basic knowledge of social justice, race, and biases to become more effective leaders in organizations of all sizes and at all stages of their development. All that’s needed is a desire to either develop or refine self-awareness practices on your team or within your organization. Participants should be in a position to enact change within their organization. This means supervisors, managers, directors, operations professionals, human resources professionals, executive directors, leaders of teams, or people with the capacity and energy to start making changes. We strongly recommend that organizations send 2-3 people to the training to partner in sharing the learning and implementation when you return to your organization. Get 10% off if you register 3 or more staff from the same organization. (See group rate ticket option on registration page.)

This workshop is brought to you in partnership with: HR & Equity Consulting Firm and Leadership for Change

Limited number of partial scholarship are available upon request. For more info, contact Mike Beebe at mpbeebe@gmail.com

Organizers: Keonna Jackson, Fleur Larsen, & Mike Beebe

This training is a collaborative effort of HR & Equity Consulting Firm's Keonna Jackson, & Fleur Larsen & Leadership for Change's Mike Beebe. Read our bios below:

Keonna Jackson

Keonna Jackson is committed to transforming lives by helping her clients uncover what blocks them from making their dreams a reality. She believes we are unlimited in our ability to accomplish our goals and she looks for opportunities to walk along side of you to see, point out and guide you towards those possibilities until you see them for yourself. She primary uses fitness to empower, inspire and motivate her clients to M.O.V.E into the body & life THEY desire! She is a multi-passionate Human Resources consultant for small to medium sized companies, with the unique skill of advocating for both the employer and employee. With over 15 years of human resources expertise, she is your strategic and tactical HR solutions business partner. She works with leadership to streamline HR administration, as well as provide solutions to ensure the mission, vision, and goals of the organization are met by applying fair and equitable practices.

Fleur Larsen

Fleur strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of her life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). She focuses on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports her clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work. Fleur started facilitating 18 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Currently, she works with several companies utilizing experiential facilitation with corporate and nonprofit groups. Fleur's style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, fun, purpose and results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach results.

Mike Beebe

Mike decided to take his passion for leadership development training and start Leadership for Change in 2004. Since then, he has worked with thousands of individuals and groups to help develop their leadership skills.  Mike has over 20 years of experience managing youth & adult leadership programs and is passionate about partnering with young people to create positive social change. His experience includes directing Penny Harvest Seattle, a youth philanthropy & service learning program, JustServe AmeriCorps, a youth anti-violence program, TEEN LINK, a hotline for youth answered by youth, and serving on the Board of Directors for COLAGE (Children of Lesbians and Gays Everywhere), a national organization advocating for the rights of GLBT families. More info on Leadership for Change can be found HERE. In 2013, Mike and a team of training colleagues launched F.A.C.E. (Facilitating Awareness & Change for Equity) Consulting Collaborative in an effort to provide stronger support to individuals, groups, and organizations striving to create a more equitable world. More info on F.A.C.E. can be found on their website.

 

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Sep
14
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations. 

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

- Exploring the narratives behind your institution's organizational chart.
- Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.
- Role-play for navigating difficult conversations and the anatomy of making amends.

Join us in this training to explore how storytelling can be used to develop concrete strategies to help individuals and organizations actively engaged in anti-racist work.

Register at the link below:
https://ssdrfall.paperform.co/

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Jun
22
9:30 AM09:30

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

June 22 9:30-4:30pm 

register here

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:Exploring the narratives behind your institution's organizational chart. Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege. Role-play for navigating difficult conversations and the anatomy of making amends.

Join us in this training to explore how storytelling can be used to develop concrete strategies to help individuals and organizations actively engaged in anti-racist work.

Register before May 26 below for the Early Registration rate of $155.00

 

TRAINING FACILITATORS

Toi Sing Woo is a bilingual racial justice activist, trainer, community organizer, and founder of New Directions Consulting. Ms. Woo is committed to supporting nonprofit organizations on their journeys to become more racially-just, and to developing services that are more meaningful to their multi-racial/multi-cultural clients. Ms. Woo has developed and conducted anti-oppression trainings both locally and nationally. Her primary skill-set pivots around facilitating group discussions on racial equity, and resource-sharing with regards to organizational capacity-building, board development, leadership development, and public policy.

Natasha Marin is an artist and independent consultant primarily engaged in the digital engagement and community building arenas. Natasha uses platforms like Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to find, connect, and build alliances among individuals and communities. Her work supports building sustainable communities through different levels of engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter. Marin has lectured and presented around the world for diverse audiences including underserved populations (incarcerated women, "at-risk" youth, non-English speakers, unsheltered people, etc). Her most recent project, Reparations, focuses on leveraging privilege and has gained local, national, and international attention.

Bert Hopkins is a racial justice educator, trainer, and consultant who has worked with numerous community-based nonprofits and foundations, in higher education, and for nine years as a middle school teacher and curriculum coordinator. Whether with young people or adults, the heart of this work has been opening space for the groups he works with to engage authentically and deeply in order to move from individual awareness to collective action. Bert works daily to actively leverage his privilege as a cis-male white-identified person.

Fleur Larsen is a social justice and equity advocate, I strive to live in integrity with my values in all areas of my life. My work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). I focus on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. I support my clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work.

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May
4
8:30 AM08:30

Food Lifeline Conference

Food Lifeline

Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 8:30am to 4:30pm

The Member Agency Conference is Food Lifeline’s annual conference providing inspiration, trainings, networking opportunities and resources for its member agencies. Session descriptions will be available soon. Registration is here.

 

'How to serve your clients better?: An equity audit strategy'

In service to meeting your mission, we will explore the social identities of who is doing the work in your organization and those of who you are serving with the intention of noticing areas to increase equity and alignment of values.

 

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Apr
20
9:30 AM09:30

Story Telling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

Join us April 20th 2017 9:30-4:30pm register here

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations. 

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

- Exploring the narratives behind your institution's organizational chart.
- Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.
- Role-play for navigating difficult conversations and the anatomy of making amends.

Join us in this training to explore how storytelling can be used to develop concrete strategies to help individuals and organizations actively engaged in anti-racist work.

Register here before March 17th for a discounted rate of $150.00:
https://paperform.co/form/storytelling-strategies-april

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Apr
6
12:00 PM12:00

HR and Equity Webinar 4/6/17

April 6th 2017 12-1pm

Human Resource work has the potential to be a powerful arena for an organization to live its’ values. The core of HR is taking care of the humans who work hard to meet the mission and serve their clients. When this is in alignment with equity, transformation is possible. Everyone benefits when diversity and inclusion are at the center of HR. This workshop will review 6 key areas within HR to increase equity, live your organization’s values and better serve your community.

Employee Equity Arc 6 key points: job posting, hiring, on-boarding, performance evaluation, retention, stay/exit interview.

Join us for this interactive workshop, together we are smarter and stronger.

Together, we can create a working environment that is fulfilling, empowering and successful.

April 6th 2017 12-1pm Register here.

About HR and Equity:

We work with leadership and HR professionals to improve and integrate HR administration to be the place that takes care of your people. We support the HR team to actualize your values of equity. You value equity, diversity and inclusion. You want to improve your current HR practices.

We can support you.

hrandequity.com

About the presenters:

Keonna Jackson is a multi-passionate Human Resources consultant for small to medium sized companies, with the unique skill of advocating for both the employer and employee. With over 15 years of human resources expertise, she is your strategic and tactical HR solutions business partner. She works with leadership to streamline HR administration, as well as provide solutions to ensure the mission, vision, and goals of the organization are met by applying fair and equitable practices.


Fleur Larsen is a facilitator with 20 years of experience working with corporate, nonprofit and governmental organizations.  From board retreats, staff trainings and off-site workshops at the challenge course, her work as a facilitator is focused on team building, emotional intelligence, social justice, experiential education and community development. Together we enhance your ability to take action and see results.

 

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RE-IMAGING RACE-BASED CONVERSATIONS
Nov
30
2:30 PM14:30

RE-IMAGING RACE-BASED CONVERSATIONS

As we venture into serious race-based conversations with friends, family members, or co-workers we should ask ourselves – are we truly ready?

 Do we understand race and racism – do we have the tools and the abilities to hold the space and move the conversations to a higher level?  

 For people of color confronting racism over the course of their lives, discussing hurtful and traumatic experiences can be painful.  How can people of color support one another?

 How can white people start and continue their own journey?   

 For people of color and white people without the ability to have productive conversations on race and racism, individuals will continue to find it impossible to critically analyze racial ideologies, increase their compassion for others, and break down barriers to engage in genuine conversations.

 In mixed race trios and small groups participants will explore their connection to race and race relations.  

  • Participants will explore why these conversations are difficult and learn practical techniques they can use to initiate honest conversations about race and racism in family, in community, and in workspaces.
  • Facilitators will model race-based conversations to demonstrate techniques and skills to hold the space and dialogues.

  • Participants will learn how to sit with being uncomfortable in the moment and stay engaged.

  • Participants will practice being present to oneself and others when emotions are high.

  • Participants will gain new perspectives on their struggles through reflection and connection with others, and will develop strategies for future conversations on race and racism.

 Join us in conversations to deepen our understanding of race and racism, to connect, and to build community. Registration is $40 per person, no one turned away for lack of funds.

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Sep
13
3:00 PM15:00

Equity in the service sectors

In this short one hour workshop we will review the current state of equity in the service sectors today. Drawing from attendees individual experience, we will look at the relationship between martyrdom, sustainability and capacity building.

Teachers, nurses and nonprofit staff are a majority white and female. We will look at the impact this dynamic has on the work, the mission and the sector.

This is a preview of the longer 4 hour and 6 hour future trainings on how martyrdom undermines equity.

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Aug
30
1:00 PM13:00

Re-imagining Race based conversations

2100 Building Aug 30th 3:00-5:00pm

Re-imaging Race Conversations  

Toi Sing Woo of New Directions Consulting and Fleur Larsen

In this workshop, participants will explore why race conversations are difficult, and learn practical techniques they can use to initiate quality conversations about race in family, community, and in workspaces. In mixed race trios and small groups we will explore our connection to race and race relations.  Through experiential activities we will integrate and envision new conversations.

Let's deepen our understanding of race through connection and building community.

As we venture into serious race-based conversations with friends, family members, or co-workers we should ask ourselves – are we truly ready?

Do we understand race and racial privilege – do we have the tools and the abilities to hold the space and move the conversations to a higher level?

For people of color confronting racism over the course of their lives, discussing hurtful and traumatic experiences can be painful.  How can people of color support one another?

How can white people start and continue their own journey?  

To address both of these dynamics there will be the opportunity for race based caucusing. 

For POC and white people without the ability to have productive conversations on race and racial privilege, individuals will continue to find it impossible to critically analyze racial ideologies, increase their compassion for others, address implicit bias, and dispel racial stereotypes and misinformation. 

 

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Aug
25
1:00 PM13:00

HR, equity and the new labor law

Human Resources, Equity and the New Labor Law: How does this impact you?

Some of you in the nonprofit sector may or may not be aware of the revised Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that becomes effective as of December 1, 2016.  These changes will not only affect employees but employers as well.  In this pilot workshop, we will review the new important changes of FLSA and how it affects your organization's bottom-line and values. Specifically we will address the connection between the labor law and issues of equity and sustainability.  

How does this impact you?:

  • Economic and racial equity

  • Work culture and work load

  • Staff morale and turn-over: paying people for their overtime may decrease turn-over

  • Job classification

  • Program quality and service delivery capacity

  • Ethics: accurate tracking and report of over-time hours

  • Bottom line: how does this affect your budget?

  • Risks of not being in compliance

What this new ruling will do:

  • More than double the salary threshold to $913/week or $47,476/annually

  • Automatically update the salary threshold every 3 years

  • Strengthen overtime protection for exempt workers who aren't currently eligible for overtime

  • Ensure overtime eligibility for 4.2 million workers nationwide, resulting in $1.2 billion dollars in additional wages paid

There are significant decisions to be made, be sure you are making them with all the information you need.

Co-Led by Keonna Jackson, Fleur Larsen. and Toi Sing Woo

2100 Building 2100 24th ave S Seattle

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May
5
7:30 AM07:30

Funders and Philanthropists Forum: Our role in sustainability, capacity building and equity

Funders and Philanthropists Forum:

We have a crucial and unique role to play in the work of furthering social good.

Sustainability, capacity building and equity work are at the forefront of our concerns.

We want to invest in work that will have a lasting impact long after our contributions are spent. To do this we get to look at the positional privilege we hold and what needs to shift to live in allignment with our values.

  • Less than 5% of people of color nationally are on boards of nonprofits

  • The 80/20 of program expenses to 'over head' rule is antiquiated and steeped in classism

  • Currently, the most money is about to be inherited by the next generation in the history of the US

We are ready to contribute and empower the people doing the work while the people most affected lead the way.

 

“The Privilege to Work for Pennies:

How martyrdom undermines equity in the Service Sectors”

The service sectors (education, government and nonprofit) are a thriving and vital force where amazing work is being done by inspired leaders in our community. All this work is wanted and needed.  However, burnout, staff turnover, changing funding landscape and lack of equity among staff and clients, are all issues that contribute to us spinning our wheels.

How can we shift from surviving to thriving?

How can we plan for sustainability when we are caught in a cycle of putting out fires?

You are invited to attend this experiential and collaborative workshop that will look at how martyrdom is undermining the long-term success of the sector and how we can contribute to a better outcome and sustainable liberation. 

How can we ensure racial and economic justice when the people in leadership do not represent those most affected?

Join me for an engaging and supportive group series addressing what's working, what's not working and solutions for it all!

Together, we’ll harness the experiences and expertise of the group to create fresh perspectives on:

      Who is doing the work and how do issues of martyrdom affect equity?

      Can there be true equity within a culture of charity and martyrdom?

      Where do we find hope and inspiration?

      What contributes to widespread systemic, sector transformation and change?

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Apr
23
7:30 AM07:30

The Privilege to Work for Pennies: How martyrdom undermines equity work in the Service Sectors

“The Privilege to Work for Pennies:

How martyrdom undermines equity in the Service Sectors”

The service sectors (education, government and nonprofit) are a thriving and vital force where amazing work is being done by inspired leaders in our community. All this work is wanted and needed.  However, burnout, staff turnover, changing funding landscape and lack of equity among staff and clients, are all issues that contribute to us spinning our wheels.

How can we shift from surviving to thriving?

How can we plan for sustainability when we are caught in a cycle of putting out fires?

You are invited to attend this experiential and collaborative workshop that will look at how martyrdom is undermining the long-term success of the sector and how we can contribute to a better outcome and sustainable liberation. 

How can we ensure racial and economic justice when the people in leadership do not represent those most affected?

Together, we’ll harness the experiences and expertise of the group to create fresh perspectives on:

      Who is doing the work and how do issues of martyrdom affect equity?

      Can there be true equity within a culture of charity and martyrdom?

      Where do we find hope and inspiration?

      What contributes to widespread systemic, sector transformation and change?

View Event →