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Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

  • Centilia Cultural Center 1660 South Roberto Maestas Festival Street Seattle, WA, 98144 United States (map)

Storytelling Strategies for Dismantling Racism

A COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP FOR INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS

Jan 10th, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m

Storytelling is an ancient human technology meant to encapsulate information and build connections. We are all capable of sharing our stories and more importantly, to witnessing and hearing each other with openness and compassion.

Many of us set out with the very best of intentions but are not always able to discern how best to implement our ideals. This course will allow participants hands-on practice using the fundamentals of storytelling: intentions vs. impact, inciting action, deep listening, facing challenges, and resolution; to bring about measurable and meaningful change in their lives and at their organizations.

How can we strategically explore and dismantle problematic racial structures in our organizations using our own personal stories?

During this training, facilitators will guide participants in the following:

+ Exploring institutional narratives and the structures.

+ Practicing deep listening, especially with regards to the language of power & privilege.

+ Role-play for navigating difficult conversations.

Natasha Marin is an artist and independent consultant primarily focused on digital engagement and community building. Natasha uses social media to find, connect, and build alliances among individuals, communities, and organizations. Her work supports building sustainable communities through creative engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter. NONWHITEWORKS supports client-collaborators with finding your audience, sharpening messaging, and connecting with influencers who can further amplify dialogues. Marin has published, lectured, and presented around the world for a diverse audience of "doers." Her social experiment, Reparations, gained local, national, and international attention for making concepts like "leveraging privilege" more accessible to the mainstream.

Charles Mudede—who writes about film, books, music, and his life in Rhodesia, Zimbabwe, the USA, and the UK for The Stranger—was born near a steel plant in Kwe Kwe, Zimbabwe. He has no memory of this birth, but he does remember noticing himself in the mirror for this first time—it happened on May 3, 1972. Mudede is also a filmmaker: Two of his films, Police Beat and Zoo, premiered at Sundance, and Zoo was screened at Cannes. Mudede has written for the New York Times, Cinema Scope, Ars Electronica, C Theory, and academic journals. He also wrote the liner notes for Best of Del Tha Funkee Homosapien: Elektra Years. Mudede has lived in Seattle since 1989.

Fleur Larsen is a social justice and equity advocate, she strives to live in integrity with my values in all areas of my life. Her work is especially relevant to people in the 'helping professions' (e.g., teaching, medicine, non-profits). Fleurs focus is on how we can show up in authentic contribution and service by doing what is wanted and needed in this world through an equity and liberation lens. She supports my clients move from “charity burnout” to a powerful position of gratitude and contribution. Martyrdom undermines equity and the sustainability of our work.

Bert Hopkins is a racial justice educator, trainer, consultant, and the Equity & Inclusion Manager at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands. He has worked with numerous community-based nonprofits and foundations, in higher education, and for nine years as a middle school teacher and curriculum coordinator. Whether with young people or adults, the heart of this work has been opening space for the groups he works with to engage authentically and deeply in order to move from individual awareness to collective action. Bert works daily to actively leverage his privilege as a cis-male white-identified person.